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in the run up to the election, one of the most famous of the mitt romney's going to win in a landslide people has decided now to turn to new data. data about a problem that does not exist. the process of publicly failing up continues. that story is next. >>> welcome to post election 2012 america. discredited and disqualified are totally unrelated. that's next. >>> welcome to post election 2012 america. discredited and disqualified are totally unrelated. that's next. - one serving of cheese is the size of four dice. one serving of cereal, a baseball. and one serving of fruit, a tennis ball. - you know, both parties agree. our kids can be healthier... the more you know. >>> things people are saying about the election that are not true, but it makes them feel better to say it any way. the man who came in second place for vice president this year is paul ryan. paul ryan, go. >> some of the turnout. some of the turnout in urban areas, which definitely gave president obama the big margin to win this race. >> president obama won reelection because of high turnout in urban areas. that's what paul rya
that is might be less important in a campaign have had in this election or do you think it's been the same thing for a long time and nothing new here? >> i guess it's outside of the campaign's control. all of this happens organically. it's no longer information flows top down. it is surround and it is bottom up and there is no private space anymore. so the time honor tradition in politics of going to one group and saying one thing and to another group and saying something different you can't do anymore. so when you try to do it you'll be caught and exposed and your character will be revealed and in a lot of instances it will have a negative consequence. but for sure when you look at the campaigns and what goes on, the campaigns to a fundamental degree have lost control of the ability to control the message and to control the dialogue. everybody with a facebook page, everybody with a twitter account has an outlet to weigh in and shape the narratives and the story. so the ability to navigate that raging river so to speak and go with the flow is an important aspect of a presidential campaign. >> an
been said about this pledge and i will tell you, when i go to the constituents that re-elected me, it is not about that pledge. it really is about trying to solve problems. and so if right now the question is, how do you do that? well, john boehner went to the white house ten days ago and said republicans in the house are willing to put revenues on the table. that was a big move, right? >> a big move? huh? the gop has always been open to raising revenue. governor romney even promised to do that. it seems awfully similar to what speaker boehner offered a year ago during debt talks. >> we have an agreement on a revenue number. there was an agreement on some additional revenues. >> i stuck my neck out a mile and i put revenues on the table. >> revenues on the table? the gop is essentially offering the same thing they did a year ago. plus, they want to keep tack rates for the wealthy the same. they want to cut entitlements, postpone pentagon cuts, and now they are putting health care on the table. mr. cantor says the gop has presented a big move. nah. losing an election is big. i'm st
president obama's former campaign manager david plouffe and steve schmidt talk about the 2012 election. both mr. playoff and mr. schmidt attended the university of delaware. >> welcome back to the national agenda program. i'm director for the center of political communication. this is the final program of the 2012 presidential election season. i'm very very pleased that all of you are here tonight and i know that's a tribute to our two guest speakers this evening. two years ago in the wake of the sha lacking president obama took in the midterm congressional elections, the architect of the president's 2008 victory david plouffe stood on this stage and predicted the electorate voting in 2012 would be more diverse and younger than it was just two years earlier. he talked then about the growing latino electorate and he predicted that the obama campaign in 2012 would have to take advantage of those demographic opportunities. plouffe also predicted on this stage that the american people in 2012 would have had enough of republicans who were like glenn beck, sara palin and rush limbaugh. we are just
or relief that at least the election didn't end up in a situation where obama won the electoral vote but romney got the popular vote. i agree that would have been bad. it would have denied the democrat the clear mandate. the implication from the right wing seemed to have been had the republican candidate won the popular vote, there would be trouble of some undefined type. what the heck did that mean? yes, we've had to put up with this ridiculous secession petitions out there, the texas version having been signed by over 100,000 people since election day, but could the right have gone further had it been armed with a popular vote victory? there does seem to be a difference in the two parties. when al gore lost 12 years ago, he ignored his 600,000 vote victory in the popular vote. he just learned to live with the irony. republicans have carefully forgotten this bit of history, but i have real doubts those on the angry, demanding right would have been so quietly obedient to constitutional law. there's something out there on the right right now that is still uneasy with this defeat. sear
's filtration processes. the most recent presidential election in the united states. there was something, if you went through the republican primaries, that people were saying, well, it's not this person. it's not -- tim drops out after the iowa caucuses and michele bachmann, and newt gingrich, and you're left with a last person standing. most often, it's not about picking a winner, but it's about picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person, and finally, you get a last person standing. >> host: process of elimination. >> guest: exactly. >> host: which is consistent in whatever organization it is? >> guest: so -- >> host: has to be? >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a platonic idea, a simp fied # version of reality that i think you use to build theory. start with simple and make them more complex, but if you take, say, ge. so ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. ge, we always tell students ge is a company that works in practice, but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything of the things we say it should do, but it's incredibly profit l and successful.
won re-election fairly handily, but so did republican incumbents in the house. these are some stunning statistics that gerrymandering has created. 93% of the 205 house republicans who ran for re-election won. 88% of them won with 55% of the vote or more. the president received between 51% and 52% of the vote. once the votes are finally all counted. and even though everyone in washington may be saying the right thing, those facts make forging a deal structurally very difficult. on monday senator dick durbin admitted what we've been hearing behind the scenes. very little has been accomplished on negotiations on the staff level. >> now for ten days not much has happened. there's been a big thanksgiving break. a lot of turkey and stuffing. but now let's get back to business. >> although the white house said they remain optimistic, there doesn't appear to be a plan for another leadership meeting until progress is made between the white house team negotiating a deal that's led by secretary geithner but the house republicans, specifically in boehner's shop. in the meantime, to create the appe
in this election. what made them think so? the polls were tight but favoring president obama. what north star was guiding the gop convincing them that the white house would be back in their hands in january? back where their hankerings were convinced it belonged? there was a darker side to this deep sense of executive entitlement, the sense they had the same assumed access to the white house as they did in the corporate dining room. it's more than a bit frighting. i have heard at least one person of the right state their pained belief or relief that at least the election didn't end up in a situation where obama won the electoral vote but romney got the popular vote. i agree that would have been bad. it would have denied the democrat the clear mandate. the implication from the right wing seemed to have been had the republican candidate won the popular vote, there would be trouble of some undefined type. what the heck did that mean? yes, we've had to put up with this ridiculous secession petitions out there, the texas version having been signed by over 100,000 people since election day, but cou
's not unique to this election or republican party. in 2004 many democrats believed he had a device on his shoulder so he would be given instructions during the debate. it's snanty. i think in our politics today both parties want to construct an image of their opponent that is not grounded in reaty. so the alternative universe. there are two. one is the romney campaign had an unrealistic view of what the electorate was going to be and that was one of the reasons they lost. certainly one of the reasons they went in the election confident. th wasn't an act. they thought they were going to win. but there is this view of barack obama. if you read and watch the conservative entertainment complex how could this guy get re-elected because we're socialist and week on terism and we're not honest and tt's not how most of america cease the president. even those that voted against us, most of them don't see us that way. so that is the problem. i think it's an underestimating of your opponent's strength and the reality of how people view them. d there was a ridicule that i think -- i don't fully unders
-faced. it has to do -- people at headquarters, they show up at election night, unless the guy or woman loses and they get excited about the guy near election night because they want a job. they want something. they want to be loved by the winner. then they treat the guy like a ticket at off-track betting on the floor you're stomping around on. is that the best case against the case being made against the republican party, it's a bunch of people just not loyal? that's what he's saying. >> absolutely, chris. look, i've been through this time and time again, that people are measuring the drapes before the first debate ends, especially if the nominee does a very good job. >> now they're measuring the crepe. >> true. mitt romney unfortunately never had any -- a loyal following, if you will, except for the folks in boston. the conservatives never trusted him. they didn't even trust him when he got the republican nomination back in the spring of this year. the point is these individuals are opportunists, both on the republican side and also on the democratic side. they don't care about loyalty. the
him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is important to us is that these issues be slelgted through dialogues, that these issues be selgtzed democraticry. we are encouraged that the various important stakeholders in egypt are now talking to each other, that president morsi is consulting on the way forward but we're not going to prejudge where that wi
of these games of chicken and scenarios is that we had an election and it was pretty clear. the democrats won. obama is back in. and one of the clearest issues in that election was that taxes should be raised and raised on the rich. that gives the president even more leverage. i think the president has enormous leverage. if we do go over the cliff in terms of tacks? we go back to the clinton tax rates, which as i remember it, were not so onerous. they certainly were pretty good in terms of the economy. the economy did not suffer. the economy did much better under clinton than bush. i don't think at least on the tax side, going over the cliff is that big of a deal. it's not really a cliff at all as you suggested and if we get major cuts in the military and defense spending, i'm not sure that's a bad idea at all. >> now, joy reid, we all deal with being dumped in different ways. that is the choice grover has made tonight on cnn. let's watch. >> i don't see any movement toward ts republicans wanting to raise taxes or people wanting to break their pledge. in fact, to be fair to everybody, some of
raise tax rates. which is why he's pushing against that idea. two senate republicans up for re-election in 2014 have bucked norquist saying they are willing to let taxes ride. chambliss spoke to his hometown station. >> that pledge i signed 20 years ago was valid then. it's valid now, but times have changed significantly. and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> on sunday south carolina senator lindsey graham also broke ranks saying the norquist pledge can no longer be a conservative litmus test. >> when you're $16 trillion in it debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece. but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if it democrats will do entitlement reform. >> but a bipartisan consensus to raise taxes grows, republicans insist they won't budge on kaepg the bush tax rates for the wealthiest at 33% and 35%. they've expressed more openness to raising revenue by eliminating individual loopholes and deductions in the tax code and believe they have public opinion on their side.
. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? what are your priorities, if so? let me read this -- on a federal level, folks believe a divided government has republicans in control of the house and democrats in control of the senate and president obama reelected to a second term in the white house. on a federal level, people believed compromise is possible. not so, says the new york times, on the state level. what are your thoughts on this? we also posted the question on our facebook page. we have a couple comments -- you can post your comments as well on facebook if you want to participate that way, or send us an e-mail or a tweet. this is inside the new york times and they have a chart showing the outcomes of the 2012 elections -- that's how it breaks down. norma is a democrat in st. petersburg, florida. what is your state legislature like and what are your priorities? caller: i voted democratic. i believe that obama offered than did the republican party. the candi
the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the
or -- >> absolutely not. they're stonewalling at every turn. they ran out the clock before the election. the president says now that the election is over, we'll cooperate. the most basic information about what happened on the night of the attack, and what survivors had to say after the attack is not being provided, and we'll talk more about that tomorrow. but long story short is i know very little from this administration about what happened in benghazi. what i'm finding out on my money makes me very upset. >> greta: is ambassador rice trying to test the waters if she's nominated? >> i have no idea, but i'll be glad to talk to her. again, it's not just about her. why did the president seven days after she spoke write this off as a video-inspired event when it's pretty clear to everybody early on this is a terrorist attack, in a coordinated way. there was no mob that turned into a riot. the riot that i've seen doesn't include heavy weapons and mortar trucks. >> greta: do i take it you're going to ask her direct questions? >> i'm going to ask her straight, direct questions because it's my job. president
. president obama's re-election means the taxes for upper income earners are going up one way or another. speaker john boehner deserves some leeway to try to mitigate the damage by negotiating a larger tax reform. leeway to negotiate sounds pretty sane to me. for some, of course, that's a great big lump of coal wrapped up as an early christmas present. >> revenue that happens to be the democratic code word for tax increases. that is simply not an acceptable position for any true conservative. republicans were not elected to rubber stamp obama's agenda. >> seems some news personalities may be taking a tax increase on the highest earners somewhat personally. anyway, republicans didn't win the white house or the senate. i wonder what other conservatives have to say about that. >> the republicans are in a shocking amount of disarray right now. the republican party has not developed an alternative idea set other than what mitt romney and paul ryan were campaigning on and sort of by default it has become their opening negotiation position. >> i see. so their opening position is the one that wa
will about the election we just had. this one's hotter, nastier, more personal. one side says it's about character, about whether a close confederate of the president told the truth, the whole truth as she knew it when she went on national television and said the death of a u.s. ambassador was a spontaneous reaction to an anti-muslim video, some trouble-making clown made out in california. ignoring john mccain and his ail argue evidence it was an organized act of terrorism. not so says the president. his u.n. ambassador and close friend simply told the truth as she was permitted to tell it, what the cia gave her to say and no more. for that he charges susan rice, in the words of the new york post, being fried. political fight fans on the tabloids relish this extreme combat what should be a good person's judgment? that's my question tonight. is susan rice now a surrogate for the president, someone to take the punishment when others above her pay grade should be answering the questions, or is she accountable for going on national television knowing she can't tell the whole truth because it
it very, very neat and controversial election that was decided that the house of representatives. he wanted to speak to this idea that we were all americans again and certainly that's the way i wish we would feel after the storm and aftermath of that. so we can learn from these moments americans are very good at coming together. doesn't feel that way right now in the midst of this election, but we also have this extraordinary moment, where we have a crisis and moment of division butting heads against each other. i am hopeful we can learn from our history and see that americans to respond to a crisis like this. >> host: as kenneth davis alluded to, the reason he's in new york and both tedious and washington is because of sandy. we had studio issuescome the sore little patch together for this "in depth" with kenneth davis. your most recent "don't know much about the american presidents" is about the american president and you talk about a couple elections. i went to took about 1800 the election of james k. polk versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. i
clip] >> i want to thank every american who participated in this election. [applause] whether you voted for the very first time -- [cheers and applause] -- or waited in long for a very long time -- by the way, we have to fix that. host: we are talking about remedies to speed up the voting process. the first call comes from michael in oregon on the line for democrats. caller: we have a very simple process here. they send us -- we get a letter in the mail. it says who we have to vote for and we send it back in. host: so there is no waiting in line? caller: none. host: do you feel like that is the best way to go? caller: i think it is great. all you have to do is register. make sure that your address is registered. they send you a ballot in the mail and you send it back in. host: our next call comes from larry on the line for independent. give me a remedy to speed of the voting process. caller: i think we could probably moved it to veterans day -- november 11. a couple of days around it. three days of voting, kind of like a national holiday. the other way i think is, i really like what the
is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown to becomes the arkansas candidate and then goes to oxford. he's an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women as mother directs in two, the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that's really where his eyes at 10 until he comes back to be a law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> imacs, author and lecturer, kenneth davis, cleaned author of the don't know much about serious talks about history, geography and more. the selling off there has written 12 adult nonfiction books including the hidden history, and nation rising and is 2012 release, "don't know >> host: author kennetn presidents." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did they don't know much series of books come fro
elected. the only thing i am honoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i am sworn in in january. >> chambliss already made a similar statement last week. the question is is this a real softening of positions? does it give them room to make deal. >> two things. first, let's look at the real room being created. so far i haven't heard anyone say i am willing to raise marginal tax rates as part of a deal. they're arguing with the head of the antitax coalition about whether closing loopholes is breaking the pledge. it is pretty narrow. it does show they're frustrated because they were sent to washington to negotiate, make deals, make things happen and they find themselves ham strung by this guy that voters haven't really heard of and saying who elected him? >> a lot just know they don't want to go off the fiscal cliff. here is the question. if republicans are building to eliminate deductions for wealthy, make the wealthy pay more, is it too far for democrats to push to get rates increased? what's the difference? >> i think the real problem here with democrats as far as democrats are
in libya. >>> the election was only three weeks ago, but president obama's about to shift back into campaign mode. and we're learning exclusive new details about the personal and professional life of the woman at the center of the scandal that forced the resignation of cia director david petraeus. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with the obama administration's latest attempt to explain the misleading information given out in the days after the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans including the u.s. ambassador to libya died in what we now know was a terrorist attack. but that isn't what the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice said when she went on national television five days after the attack. today rice is up on capitol hill. she's explaining what happened and some big-name republicans clearly are not very happy with her answers. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following what's become a pretty long day -- a tiring day for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. what's the latest,
times to -- in 105 times to change tallies on election night. which explains his refusal to accept the results. if karl rove doesn't resign, the evidence goes to a certain painfully bored nemesis hanging out in an embassy in london. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> but more importantly, they're going to give the evidence to the fbi. >> stephanie: the frog marching of karl rove might happen. >> in 2004, at 11:13, all of the servers crashed and it bounced to another server in tennessee. the votes came back suddenly. kerry was leading in a landslide. >> stephanie: i'm not a constitutional scholar which i know shocks both of you. can john kerry be retroactively named president after president obama? >> no. >> stephanie: why not? >> because. >> stephanie: okay. >> no, he can't be. >> stephanie: fine, you're constitutional scholars but i'm not. >> the server crashed at 11:13 they bounced over to -- i don't know where they went -- but they were able to keep them from flipping the votes. that's why rove was so stunned
they have a mandate from the election. that is the issue we said is going to be the linchpin for the last three months. it continues to be there. there is no movement on that. and until there's movement on how to come up with that type of revenue, 250 and above, we're going to keep having the same conversation about ongoing negotiations, talking points from both sides. >> luke russert getting down to the nitty-gritty. stephanie, let's get down to the markets. they put our chances of going over the cliff at about 5%. so why is the market freaking out? >> you know the market always wants to be a bull but it doesn't matter what side of the aisle to sit on you. have to agree we're not working with an efficient government right now and we haven't in a very, very long time. and the market, if you remember, the day after the election dropped 300 points. that was the dow. fearing the fiscal cliff approaching. since then it's been very quiet out of washington. we hear a push here arc nudge there, but nothing sizeable is happening. what does the market do, they put their pencils down. we're seeing
, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions coming one day after egypt help broker a cease-fire in the gaza strip. former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. john bolton joined us earlier to weigh in saying it's no coincidence. >> he didn't wait but one day before moving here. so whether he had a wink and a nod from president obama or whether whether he felt emboldened in the wake of the cease-fire to believe the u.s. would not criticize him or do anything major to stop this power grab, i think we'll have to find out in the next few days. the timing is not coincidental. you can bet on that. >> heather: coming up the latest reaction from the white house to the turmoil
before when the early voting numbers look good for us. >> you thought it long before the election. i know that. [laughter] >> but i was pretty sure -- >> how long? could he have one after the first debate or where the forces in motion? >> sure, absolutely he could have one. -- won. it was competitive the entire way. i think governor romney could have one up until the end. i always believe in the fundamental truth, we were building the best grass roots campaign in modern political history. we had the best candidate and the best message. >> in a way, the story of this election is the degree to which replicated the 2008 results. many people thought that 2008 was a once-in-a-lifetime result. you came very close to replicating it. i think the most fascinating statistic is african-americans in ohio, 11% of the electorate, 15% this time. you found 200,000 more african- american voters who turned out for you. mitt romney lost the state by 103,000. that was the election, right there. finding those extra african american voters. >> let me back up. we won this election because of barack obama. peopl
. that is what they are elected for. i just do not think the states would benefit from having grand elections, more spending, more commercials and when the money needs to go directly to the people. we also need to be wary of cutting spending on the platform, cuts in programs of obama's platform. host: do you think the states should use their line of communication of congress or the white house? caller: i think we need to trust the congress and believe that we have elected them to do the state's business and trust them to do it. host: let's go to mike. caller: i think the states already have several budgets to their elected officials. if the governor wants to have a say on the budget, get a hold of their elected officials, their congressman, bring them to the governor's office and laid the lot down to them on what the what the congressman to go back and portray in washington. host: let's hear what marie has to say on the independent line. caller: i think only the blue states should have a say because the blue states contribute overwhelmingly more money to the federal government. the red states
a low profile. sheraton did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed to elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. to the governor's of louisiana and texas. there indian warrior slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. it was here he began prosecuting with brutal effect for the decorate that -- strategy he implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of total war. as waged in the shenandoah valley. it was a milder form of the cruder -- they were in agreement that in inflicting suffering on southern civilians would more quickly end the bloodshed. in urging sheraton to conduct the war in the shenandoah, if the war is to last another year, we the valley to remain barren waste. he a barn full of wheat i would rather sooner lose the barn and wheat than my son. unlike the broader sill burning as it was called horrified and bittered valley residences. one described how the innovators came up the valley sweeping everything before them like a hurricane. there's nothing left from the horse down to the chick. en. raid the new settlement on the plain
. after that, more about the election with president obama's campaign master. later -- the evolution of facebook. >> the average new facebook user is in india or indonesia or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access facebook because they have not had access to a broad band connection. in a lot of cases there is not an infrastructure media of communications you have in the u.s. and lot of americans will leave me and say facebook is great for gossiping and to see what my friends are in for lunch, but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story -- facebook was providing access to news, people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get out otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company -- thanksgiving day on c-span. at 2:00 -- 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nash at -- nasa officials pay amash to the first man to walk on the moon, neil armstrong. >> federer reserv
an election in january, so there's no real hope that there will be a longer-term agreement before that election, and after that it is anyone's guess as to what type of an agreement they will have here and will anybody be able to forge an agreement that will lead to a lasting peace? that is still a very big question going forward, rick. rick: conor powell live on the ground in jerusalem, thanks. heather: well, u.n. ambassador susan rice defending those early comments on the benghazi terror attacks just days after the raid on the u.s. consulate. ambassador rice went on five sunday talk shows and said that the attack grew out of a spontaneous to protest over an anti-muslim film. and now she says those remarks were based on the intelligence she was given. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. heather: national security correspondent jennifer griffin
obama running for the presidency in 2008. if he had lost the senate election, that is the level of national maturity we are talking about here. >> profiling historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those that have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern part of the holiday weekend on c-span to. up next, the history of the presidential appointment process with public policy professor james sister that criticizes the current confirmation process and it talks about how it can be improved. this is just under an hour. >> what happens the day after the election when the president of homes of pointing? it will happen one way or the other. the romney transition team has been working on this for months and i am sure they are ready for it. the obama administration is ready to fill vacancies. this will have rebels all the way down the hierarchy. what i would like to discuss tonight is how we got from where we are, the politics of patronage, the challenges of recruiting political appointees , how the syste
. >> the gop post election fallout continues on a couple fronts. >> the fiscal cliff is getting shorter and shorter. >> voters agreed with me on this issue. >> more than congressional republicans. >> we don't understand. >> americans didn't vote for dysfunction. >> the voters agreed with me on this issue. >> they voted for government that works. >> we don't understand why raising tax rates is the solution. >> can party leaders get a deal? >> impossible. >> all this talk about taxing the rich is nonsense. >> grover norquist. >> you speak of grover norquist. >> he's an entertaining warrior. >> pledge mentality is really on the run right now. >> speaker boehner clearly wants a deal. >> he can't have one arm tied behind his back. >> the top 1%, only 42% of the wealth. >> 48.5 million people lived below the poverty level. >> we should ask the wealthy to start paying their fair share. >> the american sense of fairness, no one should pay more than 25%. >> today's republican party has imploded. >> they are in denial. >> they are looking for someone to blame. >> grover is no longer speaking for
election. what will you do? go to disneyland. >> exactly. >> people accuse him of being there all alistening. >> but look. if you look at that list of people we had on politico's home page, 18 republicans. here's the good news. four minorities and no one old enough to take social security. if you're a republican and just wiped out in this election, you're ready to look to 2016. you don't care about mitt romney anymore. you're like, okay, what do we have? we have a bright future here with women, minorities, with younger people and it's never too early. we're politico -- political junkies here. marco rubio has already been to iowa. >> there is a deep bempbl of smart talent on the right. several names of front-runners. but take a listen to what jeb bush jr. and senator ran paul are saying about that very issue. >> your dad going to run for president? >> i don't know. no comment. i certainly hope so. >> going to be another paul for president campaign? >> that's classified. i can't tell you that. you don't have clearance to hear that. you know, i want to be part of the national debate.
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